Primary apples and caucus oranges

Here’s a great article from the BBC blowing holes in Senator Hillary Clinton’s claim that running a popular vote lead should matter as the super-delegates weigh their decision for the Democratic convention:

Therefore, the national vote total is heavily skewed to the states holding primaries, and this total mixes primary apples and caucus oranges in an unenlightening way.

The concept of the national popular vote is borrowed from the general election, when it makes more sense. However, in the nominating season the idea is dubious, and it is not a particularly useful measure for the undecided super-delegates. Nevertheless, it has been bandied about so much by the campaigns and news media that it has now become an inescapable yardstick of electoral validity for Clinton and Obama.

Remember, it’s a party’s decision to put forward a nominee, not the American public’s. If the process goes poorly, it’s the party’s fault, not Congress or the President or even “the system.” I hope voters can keep that in mind as this decision drags on.

Comments

  1. Dave Frank says:

    “If the process goes poorly, it’s the party’s fault, not Congress or the President or even “the system.”

    You are being too kind. This race has been a disaster for the party. It can be salvaged, but it will take a great deal of work. Michigan and Florida will come back to rear their ugly heads I am sure. I am not saying it is anyone’s fault in particular but let’s be honest the Democrats are kidding themselves when they say “this is good for the party.” Having one nominee to strike back at McCain would be good for the party….

  2. A lot of people don’t realize party nominations are just that–functions of a party. They are not government procedures.

  3. Al Goreleone says:

    I might be available to be drafted. The Global Warming gig is getting shaky.