How do you feel about this?

Santiago Calatrava has also designed the September 11th memorial in New York City. Do you think it will change the way we feel in Milwaukee for our art museum?

Comments

  1. Shawn Matson says:

    Nope, I think ours is still the hallmark Calatrava and probably always will be. Milwaukee introduced Santiago to the USA and for that we can be proud.

  2. Although I am no fan of modern architecture, I do like our Calatrava. At times it reminds me of a seagull and at others some sort of sailing ship. It fits the setting beautifully.

    His New York Sept. 11 piece does not seem to fit the setting or theme. It strikes me as a fish skeleton instead of something honoring those who gave and lost their lives there.

    I think we got the better design.

  3. Kathryn says:

    Nah. The WTC memorial will probably be equally lovely from the inside, but the exterior is a little creepy. It is evocative of the jagged remnants of the original structures, while the MAM evokes the lake: sails and wind and flight. Each is appropriate for it’s respective site.

  4. Kathryn says:

    Or a fish skeleton, Kyle! It does look prehistoric, doesn’t it?

  5. I was thinking a spiny blowfish.

    I’m not sure that I like it, but I do think it will be a shame if Calatrava gets stuck in a “winged” thing for the rest of his career.

  6. Shawn Matson says:

    No he has lots of other stuff without wings, plus the 9/11 memorial isn’t really winged, it’s more spiked.

  7. The Chicago Spire is one of those wingless projects.

    Personally, I think Calatrava is using bits of MAM in NYC, and for that Milwaukee should be proud. Our design is modeled? Impressive, I say.

  8. Kathryn says:

    Calatrava was using bits of Europe in MAM, and it seems to me, bits of Eero Saarinen (TWA terminal) in Europe for a very long time. No surprise that he treated the old Saarinen wing with some respect. We can be glad of that, too.

  9. Shawn Matson says:

    Might it be that he has a distinctive style?

  10. Obama Mama says:

    The Calatrava design is actually a subway station and not part of the actual “memorial”.

    Although it does similarly resemble the style of Milwaukee’s piece, it is very reminiscent of all his buildings.

    In addition, it is not in the center of the memorial’s grounds and will thus become less of a focal point.

    Here is a link to the actual memorial, which features the original two footprints of the towers and a museum: http://www.renewnyc.com/ThePlan/memorial.asp